The Obiex Block: Starting Out As A UAV Pilot Helped Me Find A Base In My Current Career

Peter Akpevwe is a Quality Assurance Engineer. In this episode of The Obiex Block, he speaks to us about how his previous career in aviation impacted his current work principle, how being a crypto trader robbed him of sleep, and his OCD-like love for fixing things.

The Obiex Block: Starting Out As A UAV Pilot Helped Me Find A Base In My Current Career
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The Obiex Block is a bi-monthly series where we interview people in Crypto, Blockchain, and Web 3.

Peter Akpevwe is a Quality Assurance Engineer. In this episode of The Obiex Block, he speaks to us about how his previous career in aviation impacted his current work principle, how being a crypto trader robbed him of sleep, and his OCD-like love for fixing things.


Let’s get to know you! Please introduce yourself.

My name is Peter Akpevwe.


Hi, Peter. It’s a pleasure to have you here. What do you do for a living?

I'm a Quality Assurance Engineer at Obiex. My job is to test software, and I really enjoy the whole testing process—it's something I love doing.

I’m sure you do. I understand that testing things can be quite fascinating.

Yeah, it’s great to see a creation come to life and that all its functionalities are intact.

Yeah, I get that. But I’m curious. Why did you become a Software Engineer? Was it your passion for the job, or you just needed a lucrative means to secure the bag?

I guess it was passion. I love making things just right, not necessarily perfect, but pretty close. It's just the way I am, you know? Whether it's organising stuff or noticing faults, I am naturally drawn to order and problem-solving.

I've got this knack for spotting issues, not to complicate things but to improve them. It's not something I show off, but I enjoy finding what needs fixing, be it in software, machines, or anything else.

Before becoming a software engineer, I was a UAV pilot, testing and training for custom-built drones.

Wow, that’s really amazing! What was that like?

In aviation, you can't afford to overlook faults. It's less forgiving—mistakes can cost lives and expensive equipment. That mindset stuck with me, making it easy to spot and fix issues in software too. Now, after working in that industry for almost nine years, it's just like a natural trait.

Nine years! That’s a lot of experience! So, why did you decide to work for a crypto-affiliated company?

It seemed exciting! While I have a basic understanding of crypto and blockchain, I'm not deeply into it. I could learn more if I wanted, but it's not a big interest for me. The excitement comes from working in a new field and seeing systems in action—it's a cool journey, and that's why I'm here.

Even if it’s not a big interest for you, you must have some views on cryptocurrency, being an active player in a crypto company. Care to share?

Yeah, crypto is a bit of a roller coaster. It has as many risks as it has great rewards. It can go really well, but if it goes south, it's really bad. It's not everyone's cup of tea, you know? It's for the risk-takers, not the faint-hearted. I wouldn't bet my personal savings on it, only money I'm cool with losing. Gotta be strong and ready for the ups and downs in this game.

Big emphasis on “not for the fainthearted.” It is a great venture, though.

Totally, but if you have the heart.

Haha, I see what you did there.

Now, tell me this. Have you ever had to give a full lecture on crypto just because you told someone where you worked?

Yeah, a few times. When people find out where I work, they sometimes ask about crypto. So, I've had to break it down for them, explaining how it works and how it doesn't. It’s hard to get some people to fully understand it sometimes, though. During those times, I just gave up on the lecture.

I’d totally do that too, because you cannot come and kill yourself.

At all. Most times, I end up directing them to the Obiex blog because that’s the best place to get a better understanding.

I couldn’t agree more. You gave them great advice by doing that.

Speaking of advice, what are the best and worst ones you have ever received about your career?

The best advice I ever got was to just start and not be afraid. Even when things seem tough to grasp, I've learned that I can understand them over time. Now, I'm not scared of challenges anymore. No matter how complicated a project seems, I'm confident I can understand it, whether it's made by humans or even aliens.


As for the worst advice, maybe I'm lucky, but I can't think of any bad advice from people around me.

I’d say. You must have great people around you then.

I like to believe so.

It seems like the case.

But, moving on, let’s talk about one topic everyone likes. Money!

Ooh, bring it on.

What is the biggest money move you have ever made in crypto?

Oh, I'd say my biggest money move in crypto was probably during the COVID lockdown. I was dabbling in both stocks and crypto at the time. Made a decent chunk, maybe around 50% on different investments, totaling less than a million, I guess—somewhere between five or six hundred grand. It was cool, but honestly, it got overwhelming with all the BP-rising crypto news and tracking everything. Ended up quitting when I couldn't get a good night's sleep.

Whoa, that’s a lot. No wonder you kept emphasising that crypto is not for the fainthearted.

Haha! Now you know I was speaking from experience.

Yeah, it’s good you chose peace of mind. But how has your present lifestyle influenced your financial habits?

I always stick to a budget and plan my spending carefully. I use Google Sheets to track everything and make sure I know where my money is going. I plan ahead for all my expenses, and if something isn't in the budget, I either save for it or put it off if it's not urgent. I even have a budget set for next year, despite uncertainties about the economy. Basically, I like to be on top of my finances and plan things out before spending.

Ouu, I really admire that.

Thank you.

Now, for our final question… What do you find most exciting about your job?

What excites me most about my job is collaborating with my colleagues. When the developers wrap up their work on a feature or product, I jump in to test it. It's always fun going through it together, dragging them, and pointing out what's off and what's spot on. The back-and-forth discussions about how things should be add an extra layer of excitement. I'm not sure if the engineers enjoy it as much as I do, but hey, it is what it is!